S&P 900 Index

Definition

The term S&P 900 Composite refers to an index that includes the same securities as the S&P 400 and S&P 500 Indices.  The S&P 900 is published and maintained by S&P Dow Jones Indices.

Explanation

The S&P 900 is a composite index that includes mid and large-cap stocks issued in the United States.  First launched on June 19, 1991, the composite is designed to provide investors with a measure of the performance of the mid and large-cap U.S. equities market.

The two components of the S&P 900 include:

  • S&P 400: a portfolio of four hundred common stocks believed to be representative of the mid-cap market.   At the time of inclusion, the market capitalization of these securities was between $1.4 billion and $5.9 billion.
  • S&P 500: a portfolio of five hundred common stocks believed to be representative of the largest, and most stable, common stock traded in the U.S. market.  The S&P 500 is the most recognized index maintained by S&P Dow Jones.  At the time of inclusion, the market capitalization of these securities was in excess of $5.3 billion.

Related Terms

S&P 900 Composite Value, S&P 900 Composite Growth, S&P 900 Pure Growth, S&P 1000 Pure Growth