S&P 1500 Index

Definition

The term S&P 1500 Composite refers to an index that includes the same securities as the S&P 400, S&P 500, and S&P 600 Indices.  The S&P 1500 is published and maintained by S&P Dow Jones Indices.

Explanation

The S&P 1500 is a composite index that includes securities that account for 90% of the total market capitalization of the United States' stocks.  The index includes small, mid and large cap stocks.  First launched on May 18, 1995, the composite is designed to provide investors with a measure of the performance of the entire U.S. equity market.

The three components of the S&P 1500 include:

  • S&P 500: a portfolio of five hundred common stocks believed to be representative of the largest, and most stable, common stock traded on the U.S. market.  The S&P 500 is the most recognized index maintained by S&P Dow Jones.  At the time of inclusion, the market capitalization of these securities was more than $5.3 billion.
  • S&P 400: a portfolio of four hundred common stocks believed to be representative of the mid-cap market.   At the time of inclusion, the market capitalization of these securities was between $1.4 billion and $5.9 billion.
  • S&P 600:  a portfolio of six hundred common stocks believed to be representative of the small-cap market.   At the time of inclusion, the market capitalization of these securities was between $400 million and $1.8 billion.

Related Terms

S&P 1500 Composite Value, S&P 1500 Composite Growth, S&P 1500 Composite Pure Growth, S&P 600