Miller Analogies Test (MAT)


The term Miller Analogies Test refers to a computer-based examination used by graduate schools as part of their admissions decision making process.  The MAT tests the student's analytical and logical reasoning skills, with total test scores that range from 200 to 600.


The Miller Analogies Test (MAT) is used by the admissions departments of university graduate schools to identify prospective students.  The test is administered electronically throughout the year.  Electronic test results are available for online viewing in 10 to 15 calendar days; reports are delivered to up to three schools in that same timeframe as part of the test fee.  Schools typically require students to take the MAT by December to be admitted to a program the following fall.

The student is given 60 minutes to answer 120 multiple choice questions of which 100 will count towards the student's score.  All of the test questions are analogies and take the form:

Green: Go:: Red: ?  (In this example, the correct answer would be Stop.)

The MAT requires the student to have a broad knowledge in areas such as culture, business, humanities, history, art, literature, religion, music, mathematics, vocabulary, natural sciences, chemistry, physics, social sciences, psychology, economics and political science.

Raw scores are converted to a scale that ranges from a low of 200 to a high of 600 points, with the median score of all participants being 400.  Students are also provided with two percentile scores ranging from 1 to 99.  One percentile score reflects the student's ranking among all test-takers, while a second score is among all students indicating the same intended major.  The test can be taken every 21 days, but students cannot take the test more than eight times in 12 months.  Results are considered valid for five years.

Related Terms

master's degree, doctoral degree, Latin honors, dissertationSAT ACT, LSAT, GMAT, GRE, MCAT, DAT, PCAT, OAT, PSAT / NMSQT, AP Exam