Job Hopping


The term job hopping refers to the practice of working a relatively short amount of time at one company before moving to another.  While the tactic of job hopping may be seen as a negative to a hiring manager, the practice can advance an individual's career as well as their salary.


In the past, employees were expected to remain loyal to their companies for a minimum of five years.  If a job applicant's resume indicated they switched companies more frequently, they were labeled "job hoppers."   Managers were cautious about hiring these individuals since they would oftentimes leave the company once they were fully up the learning curve and productive members of their team.

As companies scaled back their "loyalty" benefits, such as traditional pension plans (defined benefits plans), the stigma of job hopping faded.  As new individuals entered the workforce, the employer's lack of commitment to their employees resulted in more "hopping" between companies to ensure a financially secure future.

Today, it's far more common for an employee to leave a company after only a couple of years and hiring managers expect to see some job hopping on a resume.  The challenge for many companies is retaining valued workers.  In direct response to this increase in job hopping, companies are focusing on retention efforts such as employee engagement programs and similar initiatives.

Related Terms

job offer letter, new job orientation, counteroffer, part-time job